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Bose sues Beats over noise-canceling patents – Boston Herald

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Boston Herald

Bose sues Beats over noise-canceling patents
Boston Herald
LAWSUIT: A customer listens to a pair of the Beats by Dr. Dre at Best Buy, but the popular headphones are now the subject of a lawsuit filed by Framingham-based Bose Corp., which alleges that the company's products, including the Beats Wireless, are ...
Bose sues Beats Electronics for allegedly infringing on noise-cancellation ...Tech Times
Bose sues Apple takeover target Beats over headphonesHouston Chronicle
Bose sues Beats over alleged use of its patented noise cancelling productTheCelebrityCafe.com
Boston Business Journal -AppPicker.com -Ubergizmo
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?The Tesla Model S doesn’t have onboard navigation in China

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Take a Tesla Model S for a spin in the US or Europe, and you'll have the help of a integrated navigation system to help you find your way. In China, you'll have to unfold a traditional, paper map. Local drivers are learning that the country's...

Clever crow knows exactly how to solve different puzzles to get food

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Clever crow knows exactly how to solve different puzzles to get food

I love it when animals can solve puzzles and problems that I can't even figure out. Here's a crow going through a bunch of different exercises to show its understanding of size, weight, density, the elements and even the amount of effort it should put in to a puzzle to win its reward.

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Cable Companies: We’re Afraid Netflix Will Demand Payment From ISPs

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Dega704 (1454673) writes While the network neutrality debate has focused primarily on whether ISPs should be able to charge companies like Netflix for faster access to consumers, cable companies are now arguing that it's really Netflix who holds the market power to charge them. This argument popped up in comments submitted to the FCC by Time Warner Cable and industry groups that represent cable companies. (National Journal writer Brendan Sasso pointed this out.) The National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA), which represents many companies including Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Cablevision, Cox, and Charter wrote to the FCC: "Even if broadband providers had an incentive to degrade their customers' online experience in some circumstances, they have no practical ability to act on such an incentive. Today's Internet ecosystem is dominated by a number of "hyper-giants" with growing power over key aspects of the Internet experience—including Google in search, Netflix and Google (YouTube) in online video, Amazon and eBay in e-commerce, and Facebook in social media. If a broadband provider were to approach one of these hyper-giants and threaten to block or degrade access to its site if it refused to pay a significant fee, such a strategy almost certainly would be self-defeating, in light of the immediately hostile reaction of consumers to such conduct. Indeed, it is more likely that these large edge providers would seek to extract payment from ISPs for delivery of video over last-mile networks." Related: an article at Gizmodo explains that it takes surprisingly little hardware to replicate (at least most of) Netflix's current online catalog in a local data center.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








This world map was created by plotting out each incident of terrorism

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This world map was created by plotting out each incident of terrorism

It's incredibly sad that we can basically paint the map of our world just by using the locations of all the incidents of terrorism since 1970. The brightest parts of the map show the areas of the world that have to deal with so much tragedy. The darkest parts are 'safe' because so few people live there.

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