Archive for April 8, 2012

Antec Eleven Hundred: The P280′s Gloves Come Off

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Towards the end of last year, I took a visit out to Antec's campus in Fremont to see two new cases: the headlining P280, and the shortly-to-follow Eleven Hundred. The P280 we've already reviewed; it's as much a complement to the existing P180 series as it is a refresh, but our review of the Eleven Hundred has been conspicuously absent since its launch. That's due to a combination of bad timing and the fact that, superficially, the Eleven Hundred has an awful lot in common with the P280, pushing other cases to the front of the line.

With the refreshed case testbed I decided it was time to take a look at the Eleven Hundred, if for no other reason than to at least get a comparison point that was similar to the P280 in our results. As it turns out, though the Eleven Hundred shares the same fundamental framework and chassis as the P280, the differences between the two are far more notable than they seem. Read on for more details on what the Eleven Hundred brings to the chassis party.

Antec Eleven Hundred: The P280′s Gloves Come Off

0

Towards the end of last year, I took a visit out to Antec's campus in Fremont to see two new cases: the headlining P280, and the shortly-to-follow Eleven Hundred. The P280 we've already reviewed; it's as much a complement to the existing P180 series as it is a refresh, but our review of the Eleven Hundred has been conspicuously absent since its launch. That's due to a combination of bad timing and the fact that, superficially, the Eleven Hundred has an awful lot in common with the P280, pushing other cases to the front of the line.

With the refreshed case testbed I decided it was time to take a look at the Eleven Hundred, if for no other reason than to at least get a comparison point that was similar to the P280 in our results. As it turns out, though the Eleven Hundred shares the same fundamental framework and chassis as the P280, the differences between the two are far more notable than they seem. Read on for more details on what the Eleven Hundred brings to the chassis party.

Philips’ new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight

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Philips' new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight
Remember those halcyon days when your mother would chide you to sit up straight should you ever start to slouch? Good news, desk jockeys, because Philips' ErgoSensor desktop monitor is here to stop your stooping now that mom's no longer around -- and it doesn't require you to wear some silly plastic pendant or occupy any of your USB real estate. The 24-inch, 250-nit, 1920 x 1080 display has a sensor in its bezel that watches you while you work, and warns you when your posture becomes poor or if you've been staring at the screen too long. It also informs users how to set up the monitor for optimal viewing distance and ergonomic position. Plus, it can tell when you're not around and shut the screen off to conserve power. We don't know how much money the monitor will cost or even when it'll be available to fix your poor sitting form, but we do know you can learn everything else about it at the source below.

Philips' new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 08 Apr 2012 23:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Philips’ new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight

0
Philips' new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight
Remember those halcyon days when your mother would chide you to sit up straight should you ever start to slouch? Good news, desk jockeys, because Philips' ErgoSensor desktop monitor is here to stop your stooping now that mom's no longer around -- and it doesn't require you to wear some silly plastic pendant or occupy any of your USB real estate. The 24-inch, 250-nit, 1920 x 1080 display has a sensor in its bezel that watches you while you work, and warns you when your posture becomes poor or if you've been staring at the screen too long. It also informs users how to set up the monitor for optimal viewing distance and ergonomic position. Plus, it can tell when you're not around and shut the screen off to conserve power. We don't know how much money the monitor will cost or even when it'll be available to fix your poor sitting form, but we do know you can learn everything else about it at the source below.

Philips' new ErgoSensor desktop display demands that you sit up straight originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 08 Apr 2012 23:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Slash Gear  |  sourcePhilips  | Email this | Comments

How James Cameron Pumped Volume Into Titanic

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MrSeb writes with ExtremeTech's account of how director (and deep sea explorer) James Cameron spent a reported $18 million converting his blockbuster movie, Titantic, to 3D. The article "looks at the primary way of managing depth in 3D films (parallax), how you add depth to a movie that was originally filmed in 2D, and some of the software (both computer and human-brain) difficulties that Cameron had to overcome in the more-than-two-year process to convert Titanic into 3D."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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